folkarchivist

Archive for 2014|Yearly archive page

Feystown Cemetery, County Antrim, North of Ireland

In Uncategorized on June 16, 2014 at 9:29 AM

I see that Feystown is one of the more popular topics in this little blog–many folks seem to visit my blog as a result of a search for it. So I thought I’d just pose the pictures I have of it. I visited there in May of 2006 and took a fair number of photos.  Most of the headstones I photographed are ones that are direct ancestors, or names I recognized for other reasons. It certainly is NOT an extensive catalogue of the cemetery, and I’d certainly encourage someone perhaps more local to do just that, catalogue the entire cemetery while the stones can still be read.  It’d also be interesting to see if there are any parish books/registers still within the church that could be photographed and indexed. If you’re going to dream, dream big. lol

So without further ado, my Feystown cemetery photos.

(please feel free to use these photos for your own personal, non-profit use so long as you give proper credit and sourcing. I”d also love to hear from you and get copies of whatever you’re using them for)

(Note that this is a Catholic church and cemetery and as such none of the names on these headstones should be submitted for re-baptism by the Mormon church or others)

 

Feystown Church and Cemetery, from the parking spots

Feystown Church and Cemetery, from the parking spots

Bellymena 220  Bellymena 223 Bellymena 224 Bellymena 227 Bellymena 228 Bellymena 229   Bellymena 233 Bellymena 230   Bellymena 238 Bellymena 239 Bellymena 242 Bellymena 243 Bellymena 245 Bellymena 249 Bellymena 251  Bellymena 255 Bellymena 256 Bellymena 257  Bellymena 260 Bellymena 261 Bellymena 262

Feystown Church and Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Church and Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

McRandal headstones

McRandal headstones

McNeill and Black families, headstone, Feystown Cemetery

McNeill and Black families, headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Feystown Cemetery

Feystown Cemetery

 

McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Jane McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

Jane McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Mulvenna Headstone, Feystown Cemetery

Mulvenna Headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

McKenty headstone, Feystown Cemetery

McKenty headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Campbell headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Campbell headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

McGavock headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

McGavock headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Interior of St. Patrick's  Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Interior of St. Patrick’s
Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Ardclinis Crosier, St. Patrick's Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Ardclinis Crosier, St. Patrick’s Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transcribing document images

In General Genealogy on January 26, 2014 at 10:47 PM

Recently a long-distance cousin of mine sent me a photographed copy of my second great grand-uncle’s will from the 1890s.  Okay, not the actual will, but the certified copy from the probate court. In any case, it was exciting in the way only us genealogists understand. ;-)

But it got me thinking. I realized I wanted to transcribe it as I read it through the first time, which would also force me to read it thoroughly and carefully at the same time. But having the images open in one window and transcribing the text into another window and then switching back and forth to move the image up or down or sideways, and then type and type…well, it’s not the funnest part of being a family researcher, is it?

So I did a google search for transcription software. And surprisingly there’s not a lot. But luckily there is Transcription (find it here: http://www.jacobboerema.nl/en/) and after transcribing that 7 page Will relatively painlessly, I’m in love with this little shareware program!  You can easily download and use it, for personal use, for free. If you need a license, or if you just find it an awesome program worth supporting, it’s only 15 euros and easily purchased through Paypal, and an email sent to the developer for the license. But I get ahead of myself. You simply open the image file from within the program and it displays that at the top of the window. At the bottom of the window is a simple rtf (rich text) window for your transcription. (I should see if I can’t figure out how to give you a screen shot here). Image

You can, as I did, do several image files to one text file so I have all 7 separate images/pages of the Will all in one text file that I can save anywhere I like.  As a basic text file it’s also very easy to copy and paste into your various programs (Clooz, Rootsmagic, Family Tree Maker, etc,)  It also has handy features like super/subscript, so when the “th” of “17th” superscript, you can transcribe exactly that way.  As well the image actually moves up every time you press “enter” (to force a line break) which is a great time and effort saver. While it didn’t stop me from having to once in awhile mouse up to the image and move it up, I didn’t have to do it nearly as often as would have any other way.

Okay, I didn’t really mean for this post to sound like an advertisement for this program…lol…but I am just so pleased with it. And I know there are many of you out there doing transcriptions like these too (sources, sources, sources!).  I’d also be interested if anyone has found any other handy little programs–feel free to leave comments.

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