folkarchivist

It’s been awhile

In Uncategorized on August 28, 2019 at 6:41 PM

But I’m still here. I’m hoping my blog archives will reappear soon too.

Most of my research in the recent years has been targeted at Grandma Deac, my “brick wall”.  She, the person herself, may remain a mystery, but with the help of DNA and a genealogist DNA cousin, we know her family hail from the Isle of Lewis, in Scotland. Which fits in with NOTHING we know about grandma Deac. But there you go. DNA unlocks doors. As far as we know, my mom is her only living descendant. So this info, while fantastically exciting to me, probably does nothing for other folks.

So, what of the other family, you ask?  Well, DNA cousins are coming out of the wooodwork there too. I’ve met Thompson, Hansom, and Smith cousins online. I’ve met others who are likely related through Co. Antrim, north of Ireland but too far back for the records we have available.

I’ve also found more records about Samuel H. Painter and his several stints in the US Civil War, bonds posted and allegiances sworn, promises made to not take up arms again. Several times. Born in 1829, he was in his early 30s when the US Civil War broke out in the 1860s. He’d been married for about 10 years and had, by that point, 9 children.  You see, that Painter stubborness goes a long ways back.  I’d like to have a talk with him, sit down and ask him why he felt so very strongly that President Lincoln was wrong.

On the Hansom side, I’ve recently been told the tale of John Wilson/Boys (father of Susanna Wilson who married Albert Hansom). It seems back in the UK, he was John Boys, married with family. Then he came to the US, and suddenly was John Wilson. He married, and had family.  It happened more often than we realize. But it also explains my own confusion about why I seemed to have conflicting reports on his surname – Wilson and Boys.  This is also the man who was okay with marrying off Susanna, his only-just 15 year old daughter, to a 26 year old man. I should, sooner than later, put some research time into finding out what happened to his first family in the UK.  They would be my own half-family too, genetically speaking!

At this point I’m finding my research more increases the breadth of our family tree than the depth of it.  Records thin out the further back in time we go. And our families seemed to like living quiet lives, with few or no records being left behind them. The 1700s may be as far as I can go with most lines.

 

 

 

 

Grandmas

In Uncategorized on March 30, 2015 at 9:03 AM

It’s funny how, as a kid, you assume that everyone has grandmas like you, and that one day you’ll become a grandma just like your own.  Like somehow, magically, as you age you will take up canning, and knitting…but not the smoking.  Until one day you’re sitting and remembering those delicious canned pears and canned cherries grandma used to make every year, that always sat in the pantry at home, and you realize it’s been 30 years since you had any of those delicious canned pears. And you don’t know how to can. Or knit. (Or smoke, thankfully.)

Thirty years, and yet I can still taste the sweetness, the rugged texture, that hint of cinnamon and cloves perhaps, in those canned pears, remember how the half-pear would slip around in the bowl, as I tried to cut it with my spoon into bite-size chunks.

And there’s a moment of intense longing for, overwhelming feeling of missing of grandma.

So, what is it today that I am taking for granted? What should I be paying special attention to, what skills are slipping out of family memory, what recipes?  It’s amazing how fast, really, these things can be forgotten. My grandfather was raised a farmer, as were the innumberable generations before him, yet I don’t know the first thing about farming.  Grandma was an amazing knitter, just sat and did it almost without thinking it seemed.  I tried teaching myself once and managed a lopsided (although now much-loved) blanket, but that’s as far as it went. So much knowledge, so many memories and skills lost to the family, things we took for granted.

Just some things to think about, and perhaps help us appreciate more that which we take for granted today.

Feystown Cemetery, County Antrim, North of Ireland

In Uncategorized on June 16, 2014 at 9:29 AM

I see that Feystown is one of the more popular topics in this little blog–many folks seem to visit my blog as a result of a search for it. So I thought I’d just pose the pictures I have of it. I visited there in May of 2006 and took a fair number of photos.  Most of the headstones I photographed are ones that are direct ancestors, or names I recognized for other reasons. It certainly is NOT an extensive catalogue of the cemetery, and I’d certainly encourage someone perhaps more local to do just that, catalogue the entire cemetery while the stones can still be read.  It’d also be interesting to see if there are any parish books/registers still within the church that could be photographed and indexed. If you’re going to dream, dream big. lol

So without further ado, my Feystown cemetery photos.

(please feel free to use these photos for your own personal, non-profit use so long as you give proper credit and sourcing. I”d also love to hear from you and get copies of whatever you’re using them for)

(Note that this is a Catholic church and cemetery and as such none of the names on these headstones should be submitted for re-baptism by the Mormon church or others)

 

Feystown Church and Cemetery, from the parking spots

Feystown Church and Cemetery, from the parking spots

Bellymena 220  Bellymena 223 Bellymena 224 Bellymena 227 Bellymena 228 Bellymena 229   Bellymena 233 Bellymena 230   Bellymena 238 Bellymena 239 Bellymena 242 Bellymena 243 Bellymena 245 Bellymena 249 Bellymena 251  Bellymena 255 Bellymena 256 Bellymena 257  Bellymena 260 Bellymena 261 Bellymena 262

Feystown Church and Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Church and Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

McRandal headstones

McRandal headstones

McNeill and Black families, headstone, Feystown Cemetery

McNeill and Black families, headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Feystown Cemetery

Feystown Cemetery

 

McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Jane McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

Jane McKinstry headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Mulvenna Headstone, Feystown Cemetery

Mulvenna Headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

McKenty headstone, Feystown Cemetery

McKenty headstone, Feystown Cemetery

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Campbell headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Campbell headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

McGavock headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

McGavock headstone, Feystown Cemetery, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Interior of St. Patrick's  Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Interior of St. Patrick’s
Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

 

Ardclinis Crosier, St. Patrick's Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland

Ardclinis Crosier, St. Patrick’s Church, Feystown, Co. Antrim, Ireland